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Tomorrow and Me

By on Nov 22, 2013 in Maria's Blog, Music Musings, The Creative Life | 0 comments

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Music has tremendous power to connect us to memories and eras of our lives. This week I reveled in the music of a sage poet and musician, Michael Nesmith. He’s best known as a Monkee and the heir to the Liquid Paper fortune, and perhaps these successes have given him the freedom to pursue many creative outlets in music, video, film, and books. During the concert, the sweet wave of recognition connected me back to my high school self, a young woman searching for spiritual truth and finding some in his work. The reunion was especially sweet because my collection of his music had been stored on vinyl and resurrected just prior to the concert. His work is the soundtrack to a beautiful, formative time. Meeting her again, she reminded me of who I am.

What music does this for you?

At this midpoint in my life, Papa Nez inspires me too, as he’s still stirring it up at 70. With renewed enthusiasm for the years ahead, I’m humming this song, Tomorrow and Me, by Michael Nesmith. You can explore more of his work on his website.

I’ve forgotten how long I’ve been sitting here
Watching my reflection in a disappearing beer
The loneliness is so thick you can slice it
The emptiness is too much for me to fight it
And while tomorrow must be met, it seems
That life’s become a jewel that dimly gleams
From its perch atop a ring that’s slightly out of round
Casting the reflection of a crying clown

Oh,
The closeness is gone
Still
The memory lives on

The distance now is growing as the highway sings
Changing the complexion and the scheme of things
And as the world begins to turn I feel the time has come
To accept apparent loss as a battle won
So with that in mind I close my eyes and kiss your cheek
Push the loneliness aside and stand on shaky feet
Then reimplant the smile that never really leaves
Gently place my heart back on my sleeve

Oh,
The closeness is gone
Still
The memory lives on

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