MichMash Podcast

Share laughs and stories with my friend Mich Hancock and I on her wonderful podcast, MichMash! We talk writing, parenting, creativity, and life. Listen in!

What’s Next? From Michael Gott

This beautiful teaching from Michael Gott starts at “Expect a miracle” and ends with the question “What’s next?” And what a great message throughout! I’m a huge fan of Michael’s music, and his words have come my way at just the right times. Listen to his words and be inspired!

4 women get a makeover and their reactions may surprise you

Thanks Upworthy, for sharing this video from BuzzFeedVideo.

Thank you, Seth Godin

Thank you, Seth Godin, for calling me on this:

The strategy is simple, I think. The strategy is to have a practice, and what it means to have a practice is to regularly and reliably do the work in a habitual way….

The notion that I do my work here, now, like this, even when I do not feel like it, and especially when I do not feel like it, is very important. Because lots and lots of people are creative when they feel like it, but you are only going to become a professional if you do it when you don’t feel like it. And that emotional waiver is why this is your work and not your hobby. – Seth Godin, quoted in Manage Your Day-to-Day: Build Your Routine, Find Your Focus, and Sharpen Your Creative Mind

 

This week I’m beginning a new practice in two ways: one) no facebook or news for at least one week; two) blocking out time in my work day to write, and only write…to “do the work in a habitual way.”

The clock conspired against me as a rare bout of insomnia had me up and writing in the dead of night. I eventually fell asleep around 5 a.m. When I woke, I expected to be so dazed that I wouldn’t hold to my practice. But I did. I fudged a little by counting my middle-of-the-night musings as part of my writing time, but on the whole I’m happy to say I found the energy and inspiration to do the work. Even when I didn’t feel like it. I’d read these words from Seth Godin just yesterday. Timely, yes!?

Have trouble saying “No”?

Check out this wonderful article with practical suggestions on how to say “no.”  If you’ve ever wished you had more time for yourself or your family, this could be the key!

Better than a Hallelujah

Fans of this site know that I love Christmas just about as much as Amy Grant does!  Her music is an essential part of my family’s holiday celebrations, and her songs have been featured and reviewed on this site.

So I wanted to be sure you heard about her new song.  It has a powerful message for us when life’s trials seem to be too much:  God loves us just as much in our pain as he does in our joy.  Maybe we think we have to get it all together before we can talk to God, like the only face God wants to see is a happy one.  “Better than a Hallelujah” assures us that no matter what we’re feeling, God loves us and throws his arms open to us anytime we turn to him–in laughter or in tears.

Amy Grant’s Her music often finds that hidden spot in my heart, heals the pain, and helps me feel God’s great love once again. Her new song and video tell a bittersweet story; maybe some of the words will touch your heart, too.

Better than a Hallelujah

Amy Grant’s new song has a powerful message for us when life’s trials seem to be too much:  God loves us just as much in our pain as he does in our joy.  Maybe we think we have to get it all together before we can talk to God, like the only face God wants to see is a happy one.  “Better than a Hallelujah” assures us that no matter what we’re feeling, God loves us and throws his arms open to us anytime we turn to him–in laughter or in tears.

Kitchen Disposal Wisdom

At Minutes to Moments, we’re all about recognizing and embracing the meaning in the seemingly ordinary tasks of our lives.

Dan Shapiro offers his humorous, heart warming insights on news that forever changed his perspective on running errands, negotiating with his wife, and fixing the kitchen disposal.

To Dan, we say, “Amen!”

Moms: take care of your Self and yourself

“Why It’s Okay (Actually, Essential) to Put Yourself First” is a wonderful article recently published on Oprah.com.  The author, Valerie Monroe, tells a compelling story of how she “learned the hard way to put myself first.”

There are really two selves to consider here, one the “self”: that woman, wife, mother, sister, friend, daughter who is always putting others first, and; the “Self”: that marvelous, unique person who has been created by God and whom God constantly invites into deeper relationship, and fuller expression, in life.

Take for example the sisters in scripture who embody these two selves:  Martha and Mary.

In Luke’s Gospel, we read: “But the Lord answered her, ‘Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things; there is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part, which will not be taken away from her.’” 

Let’s rewind a bit and take a look at the scene that took place before Jesus’ remark to Martha. When we first met Martha, she was running around her house hosting Jesus and his disciples. Martha was trying to be a good hostess; after all, she had a celebrity in her midst! In her whirlwind of activity, she noticed her sister, Mary, had seated herself at the foot of Jesus and was enjoying his teaching. Noting Jesus’ hold on Mary’s attention, Martha asked him to intercede with Mary and ask her to contribute to the work of entertaining their guests. Instead, Jesus turns his rebuke to Martha, and seems to judge her efforts as unimportant.

How hurtful and confusing! Martha was doing what she’d been raised to do—prepare a lovely table for her guests—and doing it well, no doubt. Yet the teacher whom she admired seemed unsympathetic to her plight. Imagine the sting of embarrassment in her heart, the flush of red on her cheeks, and the tears that filled her eyes as she turned away from Jesus.

We cannot hear the tone of voice with which Jesus speaks to Martha. If she was harried and unable to enjoy herself at the party, perhaps his words were spoken with compassion. Perhaps he was inviting her to relax a bit and enjoy the fellowship of the gathering, and not let the tasks of entertaining consume her. This is good advice for everyday of life, not just when hosting a party. Martha, so occupied with serving others, needs to tend her “self” so that she won’t get burned out.

Perhaps Mary’s is the better choice, or at least should be the first choice in our busy lives–to take time in prayer and quiet ourselves in the presence of God.  Mary
 is tending to her “Self”:  that part of her where God resides.

Our busy days challenge us to attend to the Self as well as the self.  When both are cared for, marvelous transformations take place.

Consider the next time we meet Martha in the Scriptures, in John’s Gospel:
“Martha said to Jesus, ‘Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died. But even now I know that God will give you whatever you ask of him.’”

Just a few few short years after her dinner party, we meet a woman transformed by faith. Jesus loved Martha, Mary, and their brother Lazarus very much. When Lazarus died, Jesus came to visit the sisters, and Martha was the one who met him on the road and proclaimed her faith in him. The one busy and distracted by many things becomes the one to declare her faith so simply and plainly that Jesus performs one of the most powerful and dramatic miracles of his ministry. Her faith healed her brother, and her family. If Martha can be so changed, there is hope for all the Martha’s in the world!

And so it is essential, to be the fullest expression of God’s love to those around us, to put our Self first, and our self. 

Why It’s Okay (Actually, Essential) to Put Yourself First

How to tap into your true power

Martha Beck’s wonderful essay on “true power” is on Oprah’s website now.  Here’s one gem:

FEAR

Always feels bad
Motivates grasping

Seizes control
Insists on certainty
Needs everything

LOVE

Always feels good
Motivates liberation
Relaxes control
Accepts uncertainty
Needs nothing